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Rose Hill Cemetery

Previous Swisher County
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Texas, Swisher County, Tulia
The history of this community cemetery dates to October 1890, just three months after Swisher County was organized and Tulia was named county seat. The first recorded burial here is that of 18-year old Louis H. Harral, who died on October 17, 1890. His parents, L. J. & N. J. Harral, obtained permission from landowner T. W. Adams to bury their son on this hillside south of the Middle Tule Creek. Twelve days later, 4-year old Robert Alonzo Hutchinson, son of W.B. & Virginia Hutchinson, died and was buried on the hill near Louis. In 1906 five acres of land surrounding the graves were officially set aside for a community cemetery.

A cemetery association was formed in 1916 under the leadership of Lula B. Tomlinson, who named the cemetery Rose Hill. The association was officially chartered by the state in 1937, and continues to maintain the site.

Among those interred here are numerous city and county elected officials, including two law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty: John Mosley (d. 1933) and Robert (Bob) Potter (d. Christmas Day, 1960). Also buried here are veterans of the Civil War, the Spanish American War, World War I, World War II, Korea and Vietnam.

(Cemeteries & Burial Sites) Includes location, directions, 2 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Kress Cemetery

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Texas, Swisher County, near Kress
This cemetery has served the community of Kress since 1907, shortly after residents of the town of Wright moved to this area when a railway was built here. F.T. Skipworth, a president of Farmers State Bank, deeded the land for cemetery use. The oldest known grave in the cemetery, that of Mary F. McMillam, dates to 1910. Since that time, many community leaders and residents of Kress, including bankers, real estate agents, ranchers and farmers, have been buried here. The Kress Cemetery Association, incorporated in 1945, maintains the cemetery, which continues to serve Kress and is a reminder of the pioneering men and women of this community.

Historic Texas Cemetery – 2006
Marker is property of the State of Texas


(Cemeteries & Burial Sites) Includes location, directions, 3 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Slaton Well

Previous Kress Cemetery
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Texas, Hale County, near Plainview
The Plainview Commercial Club, led by President J. O. Wyckoff, saw the potential of irrigation during a 1910 visit to wells in New Mexico. Local banker and farmer J. H. Slaton agreed to bear cost of a test well sunk on his land if it succeeded. G. E. Green and J. N. McNaughton completed the well in Jan. 1911. At 130 feet, using a nine-inch centrifugal pump, it yielded 1,700 gallons of water a minute. The success of the Slaton Well led to extensive irrigation. It transformed this semiarid area of West Texas into one of the most productive food crop regions in the world.
text from: Texas Historical Commission, Historic Sites Atlas

(Agriculture) Includes location, directions, 3 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

The Diamond Spring

Previous Slaton Well
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New Jersey, Morris County, Denville
The Diamond Spring Water Company, owned by James Miller, supplied bottled water to city of Newark, 1885-1900. The Miller family later operated nearby Diamond Spring Inn as Summer Hotel.

(Industry & Commerce • Charity & Public Work) Includes location, directions, 5 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

St. John’s Church

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New Jersey, Morris County, Dover
Oldest standing church in Dover. Built by architect Richard Upjohn. Congregation organized 1849. Originally met in nearby Stone Academy. Church served as hospital during 1918 influenza epidemic.

(Churches, Etc.) Includes location, directions, 2 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Job Allen Iron Works

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New Jersey, Morris County, Denville
Site of forge and farm established by Job Allen on Rockaway River later operated by his son, Job Allen, II, Captain in Morris Militia.

(Colonial Era • Industry & Commerce) Includes location, directions, 2 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Old Stone Academy

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New Jersey, Morris County, Dover
Dover's oldest public meeting house built by town forefather Henry McFarlan. Served as school and place of worship for Presbyterian and Episcopalian Congregations.

(Churches, Etc. • Education • Charity & Public Work) Includes location, directions, 2 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Adam Miller House

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New Jersey, Morris County, Boonton
Built by Adam Miller, Quaker, who was first to free slaves in Morris County. Poorhouse for Pequannock Township 1824-1837. Addition built in nineteenth century.

(Colonial Era • Charity & Public Work • African Americans) Includes location, directions, 4 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Decker-Kincaid Homestead

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New Jersey, Morris County, Boonton
This 1785 house has an 1837 wing built by forge owner John Decker featuring spoon-worked plaster walls and an enigmatic folk art face wall painting. Land preservationist Oscar Kincaid, Jr. lived here. The Kincaid family operated the farmstand from the 1920s until 2000.

(Notable Buildings • Industry & Commerce) Includes location, directions, 4 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Palmyra Well

Next Palmyra
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Kansas, Douglas County, Baldwin City
This well was hand dug when the town of Palmyra was established in 1857, it served travelers on the Santa Fe Trail, as well as townspeople.

The well is 25 ft in diameter and 56 ft deep and about 17 ft to water.

(Settlements & Settlers • Charity & Public Work) Includes location, directions, 3 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Palmyra

Previous Palmyra Well
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Kansas, Douglas County, Baldwin City
First important repair stop
on the Santa Fe Trail
Blacksmith~~General Store~~Hotel
Well~~Saw Mill~~Post Office
Lawyer
Settled 1856 Surveyed 1857

The Palmyra Association Donated
the Land for Baker University
and City of Baldwin

Stone Base
Santa Fe Trail 1822-1872 Marked by the Daughters of the American Revolution and the State of Kansas 1906

(Settlements & Settlers) Includes location, directions, 1 photo, GPS coordinates, map.

Dr. James Henry Wayland

Previous Palmyra
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Texas, Hale County, Plainview
James H. Wayland, born in Missouri, decided to be a physician after he almost lost a foot at 16 in an accident. He studied at Kentucky School of Medicine, then came to Texas. After practicing in Fort Worth and Azle, he moved to the new town of Plainview in 1891. Here he became one of the most active doctors within a 100-mile radius. He used a compass, and at times left homing pigeons to call him to lingering patients. Often he left his own tired horse and took one offered by a rancher. He had trees planted for landmarks on the Plains, and also grew and gave out trees for beautifying this city where he and his wife Sarah (Tucker) reared a family of nine children.
He erected several buildings, operated a drugstore, and became a religious and civic leader, joining his fellow townsmen in giving bonuses to secure better public facilities. He and his wife gave $10,000 and 25 acres of land for Wayland College, which opened in 1910. In the 1918 influenza epidemic that killed millions throughout the world, he lost his health from overwork. Afterward he and his wife operated a hotel. He died at age 85, after being honored many times for the good works he had performed for Plainview and the West Texas area.

(Science & Medicine) Includes location, directions, 4 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Gates Hall

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Texas, Hale County, Plainview
Original administration building of Wayland Baptist College.

Site (in town founded in 1887) given by J. H. Wayland, a physician settling here 1891.

Built 1909-1910, in term of first President, Dr. I. E. Gates, for whom it is named.

Recorded Texas Historic Landmark – 1965

(Education) Includes location, directions, 3 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Sam Ealy Johnson, Sr., House

Previous Gates Hall
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Texas, Gillespie County, near Stonewall
The scene was a common one: young Lyndon Johnson, only a few years old, toddling down the road to visit his grandparents in this house. Here he found a ready supply of apples, candy, and affection. The future president felt a powerful attraction to his paternal grandparents, Sam Johnson, Sr., and Eliza Bunton Johnson; he would always identify himself with the frontier struggles they had endured.

Sam and Eliza Johnson were among the first and most successful of hill country cattle drovers, settling near what is now Johnson City in the late 1860s. After amassing a fortune, they lost it, and eventually resettled here along the Pedernales, where, Eliza Johnson remembered, “the temp of life was slower.” Sam lived here until his death in 1915. Eliza lived until 1917. Both are buried in the Johnson family cemetery.

(Right Photo Caption)
Sam Ealy Johnson, Sr., his wife Eliza, and family members gather round a Model T parked in the driveway of this home. Lyndon Johnson may be the boy standing in front of the car.

(Notable Places) Includes location, directions, 4 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Housing the World

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Texas, Gillespie County, near Stonewall
The welcome mat at the Johnson home read, “All the World is Welcome here.” But as the house became an alternate White House it soon became clear there was not enough room. Describing the steady stream of visitors in her home, Lady Bird Johnson exclaimed, “These old walls are bursting at the seams!”

Other houses on the ranch were soon pressed into service. Here visitors learned there was a world beyond the Potomac where cattle still roamed, and rivers flowed steadily into the future.

These homes had more than a practical purpose. The Birthplace, Cedar Guest House, and others on the ranch were ideal places, away from the chaos of Washington, where leaders and staff could chart the course of the War on Poverty and the Great Society.

(Middle Left Photo Caption)
Being a practical but also sentimental man, Lyndon Johnson often remodeled existing homes such as the Sam E. Johnson, Sr. farmhouse. Originally a dog-trot cabin, the home turned out to be an idyllic place for overnight visitors.

(Bottom Left Photo Caption)
When needed, new guest homes were built. The Cedar Guest House provided lodging for such well-known figures as Walter Cronkite.

(Right Photo Caption)
Lyndon Johnson demonstrates the water pump at his birthplace to Secretary of Labor Willard Wirtz (left) and Secretary of Commerce Luther Hodges (center), 1964.

(Notable Places) Includes location, directions, 3 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Wayland Heritage Plaza

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Texas, Hale County, Plainview
The Wayland Heritage Plaza, featuring the bronze statue of the university's founder and namesake, Dr. James Henry Wayland, was formally dedicated Aug, 20-21, 2008, as part of WBU's centennial celebration with the theme “Dreams to Reality.” The first ceremony was an outdoor chapel service for students, faculty and staff at 11 A.M. Aug. 20 and also included opening of a time capsule buried just to the north of the main entrance of Gates Hall in 1984. The second ceremony for the general public was held the next evening with mayor John C. Anderson presenting a proclamation saluting the occasion. Several members of the Wayland family attended, including Beulah McInnish, Dr. Wayland's granddaughter who was raised as one of his children. She was 99 at the time of the dedication. The Wayland statue was created by nationally-known Lubbock sculptor Eddie Dixon and is 1 ½ times life size. Bricks for the plaza were salvaged from Matador Hall, the women's dorm and first building finished on campus, which was torn down in the late 1990's. Major funding for the plaza came from the James and Eva Mayer foundation of Plainview. Gifts for the statue were secured over a period of several years.

(Education) Includes location, directions, 3 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Discover Wahkeena Falls

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Oregon, Multnomah County, near Corbett
Stretching from rainforest to desert, and from sea level to mountains, the Columbia Gorge provides a wide range of habitat for plants and animals. The Wahkeena Creek watershed is only one example of a unique gorge ecosystem.

Wahkeena Falls. This 242 ft falls was once known as Gordon Falls in honor of pioneer hald-owner F.E. Gordon. In 1915, a committee of the Mazamas changed the name of the creek and falls to Wahkeena—the Yakima Indian word for “most beautiful.”

Pika (Ochotona princeps). Colonies of these chunky members of the rabbit family live in talus slopes. Pikas are vegeterians, and they store quantities of dried plans for winter. When not making hay, pikas sun themselves on rocks and communicate with distinctive, high-pitched barks—Enk!

Cliffs and Talus. The erosive action of frost and ice on exposed bedrock cliffs dislodges rocks which fall to form sloping piles of debris called talus. As this process continues, cliffs glow steeper and talus piles deeper. Plants and animals find homes in the ledges and caes carved in cliffs, and in the spaces between fallen rocks.

Dunn’s Salamander Plethodon dunni. Look for this hardy amphibian, the largest of our woodland salamanders, among boulders and in talus along streams or near waterfalls.

Rufus-sided Towhee Pipilo erythrophthalmus. Commonly found in brushy habitat, this sparrow scratches the leaf litter kicking both feet backwards to uncover seeds and insects. Its presence is often detected by the songs “drink your test,” or “meeu ’u ’we?”

Broad-leaf Stonecrop (Sedum spathulifolium). These brilliant yellow wildflowers are partial to cliffs, gravelly benches and talus slopes along Wahkeena Trail from May through June—the are also a favorite food of the pika.

Simon Benson. Lumberman and philanthropist Simon Benson, donated the property that includes today’s Benson State Park to the City of Portland who later conveyed it to the State of Oregon and the Forest Service.

“How often I have realized the poet’s buoyant hopes amid ... solitary rambles through interminable Forests!” —Thomas Nuttal, Botanist 1834

Wahkeena Trail. Wahkeena Trail climbs to 900 feet for a specacular view of the Columbia River, described by Ruyard Kippling as “penned between gigantic stone walls crowned with the ruined bastions of Oriental palaces.” Traveling among rocks festooned with deer fern, the trail follows the creek close to its source and enters a steep forest of moss-hung vine maple, sword fern, and 200-foot Douglas firs to end at Larch Mountain Trail in 2.8 miles. Wahkeena Trail connects several other trails enroute and allows many loop possibilities.

Wahkeena Creek—Isolated and Unique. Without a network of tributary streams flowing from higher elevations, Wahkeena Creek is isolated from adjacent watersheds. This isolation has created a unique habitat for 8 species of aquatic insects that are only found in the Columbia River Gorge. No other watershed in the Pacific Northwest can yet claim this many endemic species. Two of these insects, the Wahkeena flightless stonefly (Nemoura wahkeena) and Anderson’s caddisfly (Neotrenuma andersoni) are only found in the Wahkeena watershed.

Be aware, walk with care. Protect your health and the ecosystem’s.
Stay on the trail and never shortcut switchbacks. Trails are provided for convenience and safety, but they also protect the environment from erosion and thousands of trampling feet.
Pack it in—pack it out! Litter is scarce in the gorge, especially along this trail. Please help keep it this way! Nobody wants to hike trails littered with debris—even orange peels and egg shells, though biodegradable, require decades to decompose. Always pack out what you pack in.

Poison Oak Rhus diversilaba. Get to know this plant—but only at a distance! Poison oak is very common at low elevations. It may appear as low ground cover is shaded areas, or as a robust shrub on sunny open slopes. Many people are severely allergic to the potent oils released from the leaves and stems of this cantankerous member of the sumac family. The best protection is avoidance!

U.S. Forest Service. Caring for the land. Take only pictures. Leave only footprints. Kill nothing but time.

(Natural Features • Environment) Includes location, directions, 3 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

The Del Carmen Convent

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Mexico, Distrito Federal, Ciudad de Mexico

Movido por Santa Teresa de Jesús, fue el provincial de la reforma teresiana del Carmelo quien acompañado por 11 religiosos más llegaron el 11 de julio de 1585 al puerto de San Juan de Ulúa, Nueva España, y el 27 de Septiembre del mismo año a la Ciudad de México. Es hasta 1615 que se inicia la construcción del convento en la huerta de Chimalistac, por fray Andrés de san Miguel concluyendo la iglesia y el convento en dos años bajo la advocación de San Ángelo Mártir, por lo que al pueblo que se formó a partir de su establecimiento se le llamó San Angel.

English translation:
Moved by the example of Saint Theresa of Avila, the head of the Theresians del Carmelo, accompanied by 11 other religious members arrived on July 11, 1585 at the port San Juan de Ulúa, New Spain (near present day Veracruz). On September 27 of the same year they arrived in Mexico City. In 1615 construction began on their convent in the garden of Chimalistac, under Friar Andrés de San Miguel, finishing the convent and church in two years in the name of San Angelo Martyr, which is why the neighborhood that formed around it was called San Angel.

(Churches, Etc. • Colonial Era • Settlements & Settlers) Includes location, directions, 4 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Simon Benson

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Oregon, Multnomah County, near Corbett
Originator of ocean going log rafts. Sponsor of the Columbia River Highway. Benefactor of Benson Polytechnic School. Donor of the Benson Tract containing Multnomah Falls, Wahkeena Falls and Benson State Park.

Patern and casting by Benson High School.

(Notable Persons • Charity & Public Work) Includes location, directions, 3 photos, GPS coordinates, map.

Museum of Modern Art

Previous Simon Benson
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Mexico, Distrito Federal, Ciudad de Mexico

El Museo de Arte Moderno es uno de los más importantes de América Latina en su género. Posee un amplio acervo que introduce al espectador en la comprensión del complejo desarrollo y evolución de las artes visuales de México y del mundo en los siglos XX y XXI.
Diseñado por el arquitecto Pedro Ramírez Vázquez y Rafael Mijares, inaugurado en 1964.

English translation:
The Museum of Modern Art is one of the most important of its kind in Latin America. It possesses a wide variety of works that introduce the viewer to better understanding the complex development and evolution of the visual arts of Mexico and the world in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Designed by architect Pedro Ramírez and Rafael Mijares, it was inaugurated in 1964.

(Arts, Letters, Music) Includes location, directions, 2 photos, GPS coordinates, map.
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